Uist man James MacLetchie tours Falklands 30 years after conflict

Uist man James MacLetchie explores the developments in eco-tourism in the Falkland Islands since his first visit in 2005.
Uist man James MacLetchie explores the developments in eco-tourism in the Falkland Islands since his first visit in 2005.

IN 1982 the Falkland Islands were brought to the world’s attention after war broke out between Britain and Argentina over ownership of the islands. After a bloody 74 day battle, the islands remained a British territory.

And too mark the 30th anniversary of the Falklands Conflict, as part of a BBC ALBA Trusadh documentary, James MacLetchie travels to the Southern Hemisphere to this remote collection of islands to see what life is like in this disputed British territory.

Now, 30 years on, there are still traces of the war scattered across the landscape, serving as a constant reminder of just how devastating and traumatic an experience it was.

How then in the years that followed, did the people recover and indeed prosper, particularly through tourism and a buoyant fishing industry?

Eco-tourism consultant James first visited the Falkland Islands in 2005 when he worked on a project and helped write their tourist brochure.

He’s now returning to explore the impact of the conflict, and to see how the islands are embracing their new tourism opportunities – particularly through the draw of its unique wildlife, with a large penguin population of up to a million nesting there each summer.

Trusadh: Na H-Eileananan Faclannach – The Falkland Islands will air on BBC ALBA on Monday, June 25th at 9pm.