Islands’ meet cancer test deadline

Pictured at the Detect Cancer Early Roadshow in Stornoway on Thursday are NHS Western Isles Macmillan Lead Cancer Nurse Gill Chadwick (left) and NHS Western Isles Senior Health Promotion Officer Kenna Macinnes (right) with representatives from the Detect Cancer Early Roadshow (centre). The roadshow was organised to offer help and advice to people on how to spot the signs and symptoms of cancer. Roadshow staff and local healthcare professions attended the roadshow this week to provide passers-by with advice and information on cancer and screening programmes.

Pictured at the Detect Cancer Early Roadshow in Stornoway on Thursday are NHS Western Isles Macmillan Lead Cancer Nurse Gill Chadwick (left) and NHS Western Isles Senior Health Promotion Officer Kenna Macinnes (right) with representatives from the Detect Cancer Early Roadshow (centre). The roadshow was organised to offer help and advice to people on how to spot the signs and symptoms of cancer. Roadshow staff and local healthcare professions attended the roadshow this week to provide passers-by with advice and information on cancer and screening programmes.

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As local work on the campaign to encourage people in the Western Isles to ‘detect cancer early’ gets well underway, NHS Western Isles is delighted to report that it continues to achieve 100 per cent against cancer waiting time targets.

According to the latest figures, between October and December last year, 100 per cent of Western Isles patients suspected to have cancer started treatment within the target time of 62 days after urgent referral (the national average was 96.9 per cent).

Within the same period, all patients in the Western Isles started treatment within the target of 31 days once the decision to treat had been made; exceeding the national average of 98.2 per cent.

NHS Western Isles Chief Executive Gordon Jamieson said: “The target set by the Scottish Government for both the 31 day and 62 day measures is 95 per cent.

“We are delighted to be able to continue to report that 100 per cent of patients in the Western Isles are receiving treatment within the national waiting time guarantees. It’s extremely important that both patients and their families to have as short a wait as possible for both diagnostic tests and treatment and that is why these measures are so important.”

He added: “Alongside ensuring that patients wait as short a time as possible, the local Health Board is also promoting the national Detect Cancer Early programme, which aims to diagnose cancers earlier and treat patients when less aggressive treatment is required.

“Together, we hope these measures will improve survival rates locally, as well as tackling people’s apprehension to approach their doctor with any concerns.”

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