Scottish drivers urged to take the Brake Pledge

Drivers are being challenged to change their behaviour
Drivers are being challenged to change their behaviour
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Drivers who are speeding or distracted - for example by a mobile phone - are considered to be the biggest threats on Scottish roads.

This is according to a survey by the charity Brake, Aviva and Specsavers to mark the start of Road Safety Week 2016 (November 21 - 27).

Brake’s Road Safety Week survey asked 1,000 drivers to identify which driving behaviour from a list of six they thought posed the biggest danger. More than three quarters (76%) of drivers in Scotland ranked speeding or distraction most highly.

Brake, Aviva and Specsavers is calling on everyone to sign the Brake Pledge in Road Safety Week. The Pledge aims to raise awareness of the importance of drivers staying slow (drive under speed limits), silent (never make or take calls, read or type), sober (never drive after any alcohol, or illegal or impairing drugs), sharp (stay focussed and don’t drive tired or with a health condition that impairs you. Get eyes tested every two years), secure (make sure everyone is belted up correctly) and sustainable (don’t use a car if you have the option to walk or cycle or can use public transport).

Brake is working towards a world where road transport is safe, sustainable, healthy and fair, and there are zero road deaths. It is extremely challenging to change drivers’ behaviour: drivers make mistakes and some knowingly take risks. This is why Brake supports a safe systems approach to save lives and the planet. This includes 20mph limits in built-up areas, segregated routes for people on foot and bicycles, crash-protection features on vehicles and ultra-low emission vehicles, and regulation and enforcement of drivers to enable safer driving choices.

Gary Rae, director of communications and campaigns for Brake, said: “Road Safety Week’s theme is action-orientated. Anyone can make and share the Brake Pledge – individuals, businesses and community organisations. Our survey shows that drivers are aware of the threat of risky behaviour by other drivers, but are inclined to play down the riskiness of their own behaviours. Everyone who drives has to step up and take responsibility.

“If every driver vowed to slow down, never drink alcohol or take drugs, never use their phones or other devices, always use seat belts and child restraints, drive when fit to do so, and minimise driving, then our roads would be safer places for everyone.”