Remember when: Stockbridge down the decades

The Stockbridge & New Town Non-Payers' anti-poll tax tea party in 1990. Picture: TSPL
The Stockbridge & New Town Non-Payers' anti-poll tax tea party in 1990. Picture: TSPL

STOCKBRIDGE is renowned for having a village atmosphere in an urban environment.

It prides itself on its community feel and supports its independent shops and traders.

Children enjoy a model train trip at 1963's Stockbridge Carnival. Picture: TSPL

Children enjoy a model train trip at 1963's Stockbridge Carnival. Picture: TSPL

But residents have issued a warning this week after licensing leaders granted a late alcohol licence to Edinburgh Accies when they redevelop their Raeburn Place ground.

Campaigners against the £8 million development – which will also include a restaurant, grocer and ice cream parlour – claim it will “kill off Stockbridge”.

The ruling to grant an alcohol licence until 1am – and 3am during the Festival and over Christmas and New Year – has led to claims that it will cause noise and antisocial behaviour and have an adverse impact on residents.

But despite the decision made by licensing leaders, residents have vowed to fight on – in true Stockbridge style.

Perusing the wares at a St Stephen Street junk shop in June 1971. Picture: TSPL

Perusing the wares at a St Stephen Street junk shop in June 1971. Picture: TSPL

In April 1990, Stockbridge residents formed an anti-poll tax group.

Even children got involved with the Stockbridge & New Town Non-Payers’ anti-poll tax tea party in Dean Park Street.

The community spirit was in full force in May 1963 during the Stockbridge Carnival, where children enjoyed a miniature train trip.

In recent years, the Stockbridge Market has become a popular attraction, both for locals and for those from other parts of the city.

Police attend when a 48-ton boiler passes through Stockbridge on its way to Leith Docks in May 1964. Picture: TSPL

Police attend when a 48-ton boiler passes through Stockbridge on its way to Leith Docks in May 1964. Picture: TSPL

Street markets and bric-a-brac sales have always had widespread appeal in Stockbridge.

St Stephen Street was turned into an outdoor market in June 1971, with bits of furniture and household items up for grabs. And locals were drawn to the scrap metal merchant sale, also in St Stephen Street, in November 1980.